The Next Buddha? Buddha Boy Tapaswi Palden Dorje – Ram Bahadur Bomjon

The Next Buddha? Buddha Boy Tapaswi Palden Dorje – Ram Bahadur Bomjon
By J Ocean Dennie

J Ocean Dennie Pictures Of Ram Bahadur Bomjon aka Buddha Boy

J Ocean Dennie Pictures Of Ram Bahadur Bomjon aka Buddha Boy

In a poor backwater region of southern Nepal, an 18-year-old boy by the name of Ram Bahadur Bomjon may very well be on his way to becoming the next Buddha.Bomjon (born c. 9 April 1990, sometimes spelled Bomjan, Banjan, or Bamjan) was dubbed ‘Buddha Boy’ by the international media back in 2005 after reports surfaced that during the course of several months of deep meditation, he neither ate nor drank. After ten months of intense media frenzy and public scrutiny, Bomjon disappeared into the jungle in March 2006, reappearing briefly later that month to announce plans to meditate in solitude for the next six years. Members of the local community and followers of Bomjon were already referring to him as the next incarnation of Buddha, something that was prophesied by Shakyamuni Buddha. In a message to devotees, however, Bomjon was quite clear that he had not yet attained Buddhahood but was simply a ‘meditator on truth’. He did suggest, however, that he was a reincarnated Tibetan rinpoche. To reflect this, the moniker Palden Dorje was adopted.

Like many others, I had first heard of ‘Buddha Boy’ during his initial period of meditation and was instantly fascinated with the story, but following this, only tidbits of news trickled out from Nepal. I thought of eventually searching for the recluse and perhaps writing an account of my adventures, imagining myself trampling through the jungle chasing whims and mirages.

I was in Bangkok when news of his public appearance suddenly broke in early November of last year. Reports at that time had indicated he would be offering darshan (a public blessing) for only a few more days. I had to act quickly, so I booked a seat on the next available flight to Kathmandu with hardly a second thought.

The list of apparent miracles associated with Palden Dorje is intriguing. In addition to his astounding feats living without sustenance or sleep, it is claimed two venomous serpents bit him with no detrimental effect. Devotees once reported seeing his head illuminated similar to the aureoles surrounding saints. On another occasion, the ground in front of him was said to have suddenly combusted into flames but he remained unscathed. He has also been spotted conversing with wildlife.

In an attempt to separate fact from legend, I planned to set out for the district of Bara, and a site near the town of Nijgadh, approximately 160 kilometers from Kathmandu.

I arrived in Simra, a convenient hub, at four in the morning after a numbing ten-hour bus ride from the capital city. I quickly checked into one of a handful of hotels in the small town known more for its choking steel factories than anything holy. After only an hour or two of rest, I hopped on a local bus, repeating to the ticket-taker, ‘Bomjon, Bomjon’. I was dropped off at the side of the highway, facing a dirt road leading into the jungle. Several hundred people were streaming down the road. As I made my way along, Nepalis and Indians passed on bicycles and tractors, in rickshaws, vans, and even crammed buses.

I eventually met up with three Nepali teens skipping school in order to receive darshan. Nirazin, was the only one of the trio to have previously seen Palden Dorje. When Nirazin first heard of him, he thought it was a joke, but after observing the young meditator up close, he realized he had made a mistake. “He is meditating for peace. He is meditating for us. I think he is the next Buddha, even though I am aware that he did not identify himself in that way”.

After a six kilometer hike to our destination, I was astonished with the sheer numbers assembled. The lineup into the gated area followed a parched river bed and extended for at least a kilometer. At the tail-end of the line were countless vendors selling fried food, religious trinkets, beads, even photos and DVD’s of Palden Dorje. Those selling traditional Tibetan kata scarves were making a killing. Nearby, there was even a hand-operated Ferris wheel. The atmosphere was festive and chaotic.
By the sheer fact I was the only visibly obvious foreigner in line, I was ushered to the front almost without delay. Entrants were forbidden to carry in cigarettes or lighters. Shoes and belts were also to be left behind. Those of us passing through the entrance were purified with water sprayed from a sprig of cedar.

We proceeded down a cordoned trail, leading back into dense jungle. Prayer flags were strewn along the path. Quickly, an ethereal serenity overtook us, accompanied by a welcome silence in contrast to the uproar of the crowds waiting in line. Everyone spoke in hushed tones, some chanted mantras, mothers shushed babies. An occasional bird song punctuated the stillness. There were butterflies everywhere.

The trail led into an arbor adorned with even more prayer flags radiating out from an imposing whitewashed stupa, about ten meters tall. In the heart of the arbor, a massive bodhi tree towered over the stupa. And there, on a pedestal at the base of the tree, sat Palden Dorje touching each kata held up to him and then dabbing the crown of the person’s head using a miniature dorje. The line was briskly moved along by a cadre of Tibetan monks and volunteer attendants.

When my turn came, I lowered my head with my arms outstretched holding the kata and walked toward him. Instead of the usual blessing, Palden Dorje grabbed the kata and slung it around my neck. I instantly felt hands on me, leading me away, but not before I had a moment to look up into his face and to gaze into his dark eyes that seemed to reflect a depth I have rarely encountered. Following this, I sat off to the side and meditated upon the scene for the rest of the morning and well into the afternoon.

I was quite taken with Palden Dorje’s appearance. For someone who had been meditating in the jungle continuously for months on end, he looked surprisingly fit and fresh. He was not emaciated in any way and I noticed he continued to maintain a fair bit of muscle tone in his arms. The messy tussled hair of earlier photos was now replaced with long curly locks well beyond shoulder length. He was donning a white robe that wrapped over his left shoulder. All in all, Palden Dorje looked comfortable and content. He remained silent save for an occasional whisper to a nearby attendant.

As the sun commenced its descent, I spoke with Romee, a Brit, and one of only a handful of foreigners present. Throughout the day, he had stood practically motionless near Palden Dorje, acting almost like a sentry, armed with poise and serenity.
Romee believed that Palden Dorje is engaged in a very high meditation that has not been publicly undertaken for centuries, if not millennia. Romee was led here through astral communications he received from the young guru. He mused that Palden Dorje will likely remain in this spot now for the rest of his life.

On my hike out back to the highway that evening, I followed the river bed which was a slightly shorter, if not dustier route. I met Moon Kim, a spry 74-year-old Korean-Canadian. “He’s a god, he’s a Buddha, whatever you want to call it,” claimed Moon. “Nobody knows how he is surviving without food or water, but it’s not a big deal for him. The way I look at it, when you go to heaven and spend a day there, a century passes here on earth, so three and a half earth years for a divine being isn’t even an hour up there.”

I returned early the next morning to receive darshan again and to continue to sit off to the side and watch the assembly line of devotees approach him for a blessing. It conjured up parallels with Amma, the famous hugging saint of southern India. It even reminded me of the solemnity of parishioners lining up to receive the sacrament of Holy Communion.

On the following morning, I was met with delirium at the gate since it was believed to be the final day of the darshan. The armed police that were present the day before were replaced on this day with boy scouts and girl scouts clearly not up to the task of crowd control. Several of the volunteers were now locked hand in hand, forming a human chain against the riotous throngs attempting to break the queue. I had to holler and wave my arms at one of them, Uman, whom I had spoken to the day before in order to gain his attention and hopefully a free pass back into the arbor. It eventually proved successful.
Before entering, I asked Uman why Palden Dorje suddenly decided to break his six-year meditation. His answer seemed to imply that conditions were ripe for a public appearance again. Uman noted how even more chaotic the situation had been at the previous site in nearby Ratanpuri. “There was just no management of the crowds back then. Now that we have been able to set up a basic system here, it makes things a lot easier for everyone.” In spite of his assurance, I noted the infancy of the infrastructure, unlike the more sprawling operation in Puttaparti, home to India’s super-celebrity guru Sathya Sai Baba.

There is definitely a pervasive rock star adoration toward Palden Dorje. One young Nepali girl I met, after asking her why she was attracted to him, said, “He’s very beautiful.” When I asked if she thought of him romantically, she blushed and said emphatically, “No, no, that would be like having God as a boyfriend.”

After parting ways with Uman, I received darshan once again and assumed my position off to the side. At some point while meditating later in the morning, an inexplicably dazzling emerald luminescence flooded my headspace for a sustained period of time before finally dissolving. There was also a period of ‘whiteness’, similar to when a camera lens is on a high exposure. Following this, throughout the afternoon, I kept sensing in my peripheral vision monks sitting beside me in meditation. When I turned my head slightly to get a better look, there was never anyone there.

As I was leaving that day, I was informed that Palden Dorje, had suddenly decided to add three more days to the darshan since people just kept coming. It looked like I would be sticking around for a little longer then.

The next day, however, threw me for another loop. This time, as I made my way down the dusty river bed, I noticed there was an almost complete absence of people heading in. There was no line-up and the arbor was even more exceptionally quiet than usual. Palden Dorje’s countenance displayed a hint of bewilderment with the trickle of people.

In spite of this, he continued undeterred. On two separate occasions, thunder struck from a completely cloudless sky. Palden Dorje looked up quickly and scanned the skies both times as if in search of some sign. Apparently, Palden Dorje had mentioned in the past that the gods would be present during his tenure and would manifest as thunder.

As each day passed, my meditations grew progressively stronger. On the fifth day, there was a robust serenity in both body and mind despite the onset of a head cold. (I had been sneezing viciously before entering the arbor). There was very little bodily discomfort, however, as I ventured deeper into Void.

The final day of the darshan saw a return to chaos. The gigantic crowd was in turmoil again and some people were seething with anger due to the constant stream of queue jumpers. Once again, thankfully, I was plucked out of the line by a boy scout who took some interest in me. He accompanied me to the area near the gate, which was sealed at that time and surrounded by monks.
When we were finally allowed in, I wondered: could this really be a scam? Could all these monks and nuns and volunteers and serious devotees, committed to the pursuit of truth, be mistaken? If the local community was trying to reap financial benefits from the Buddha Boy phenomenon as some suggested, why restrict his public appearances? If the skeptics were to be believed, then where was the incontrovertible proof of wrongdoing? So far, I had seen nothing convincing to tarnish a reputation.

I was led to a section reserved for journalists very close to where Palden Dorje sat on his pedestal, boxed in by cloth erected to act as a visual barrier. At least half a dozen news network cameras from Nepal or India were arranged in front with a barrage of microphones. A single female Western journalist scribbled notes onto a pad. Monks and nuns were seated opposite us in a section reserved exclusively for them. The public then sat in a wide circle around the tree.

As the minutes passed, the restlessness escalated into a madhouse mania. Though it seemed quite comical and silly, there was a tinge of sadness when I realized how we contort such a thing of virtue into a media-exploited extravaganza. I am just as much to blame. I worry that a simple purity will be devoured by the obsessive sophistications of our society. A boy meditating in the jungle is not enough for us. World tours, bestsellers and talk show interviews would be the new standard.

Palden Dorje stood up to the microphones and held the attention of the restless crowd for the ten minutes or so that he spoke in Nepali. Strangely, he concluded halfway between a sentence, trailing off, letting the words, both spoken and unspoken, hang in the air. The brief spell of serenity quickly degenerated into a frenzy again as Palden Dorje returned to his pedestal and people began lining up to receive darshan. The young man suddenly shifted gears into overdrive, ludicrously blessing with a pace so quick he was practically bonking people on the head with the dorje as they passed.

In the midst of the pushing and shoving nearby, I was led into a profound meditation, insulated from the riot but still acutely aware of it. I remained motionless in body and mind for over an hour. When I opened my eyes, I noticed I was the only one in the midst of thousands who had bothered to do such a thing. At least Palden Dorje was smiling. It was all quite surreal. Instead of trying to line up, I left quietly, bowing inconspicuously, brimming with a wondrous delight.

Since Palden Dorje was not about to indulge me with an exclusive interview, I wanted to speak to a fellow by the name of Jas Waiba. As a member of the steering committee that liaises with Palden Dorje, I figured he would be a reliable authority. When I arrived at the site the next day, I was not surprised to see the place practically deserted – all the vendors had disappeared while only a handful of monks and nuns remained, packing up in preparation to head out. Plastic bags tossed about silently on a slight breeze. The gate was barricaded and a single monk sat in the shade to guard against any unauthorized entry. The whole thing had the feel of the day following the conclusion of an outdoor music festival. Palden Dorje was on his own again.

I eventually caught up to Jas on his way home. Jas has been a committee member for over a year now. The committee is comprised of members mostly from local communities. It was formed as a response to the crowds and problems that swelled as news of the boy spread like wildfire. Jas told me the committee can do nothing without the consent of Palden Dorje. Typically, the committee is summoned when a signal is received from Palden Dorje, a signal only one or two individuals have knowledge of.
“Before,” Jas exclaimed, “Palden Dorje was in deep meditation. Now, he is conducting special esoteric exercises and holding conversations with gods.” I asked him if he himself had been privy to any miracles. With a slightly ominous tone, Jas said, “sometimes, we hear explosions and trees cracking, and when we go to investigate, there is no sign of any damage.”

Over lunch, Jas is quite straightforward in his assessment of Palden Dorje. “He is a bodhisattva. In the future, he will be Maitreya, the next Buddha. This is a certainty. I am confident in this because I have witnessed how he mixes peace with power. He can destroy and he can create. I cannot give you all the details at this time because I have been sworn to secrecy with respect to some matters.” He later hinted, however, toward some esoteric power that could possibly render the weapons of the world completely useless.

Jas is unconcerned with the naysayers. “There is no way to dispute them. Everyone has a right to be skeptical. It is not my job to convince them. I know what I know. Truth comes through illumination not attempts at convincing someone.”

Palden Dorje could very well be the one the world has waited for, but how can someone ever know for sure. He is markedly different from other gurus I have encountered. No matter what his status, he is an inspiration.

Although I can certainly say that Palden Dorje embodies a very powerful essence, what else had I actually discovered about him? It all seemed so ephemeral. I felt like I had failed to clearly ascertain the truth behind this Nepali teen but, on the other hand, I realized there is some value in what remains mysterious.

So perhaps it is best to leave it as such. Better yet, when he is ready for visitors again, why not book a flight to Nepal and experience the phenomenon for yourself?

This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com

Digital Journal Reference

Ram Bomjon – Buddha Boy Banjan – Ram Bomjan – Buddha Boy Bamjan – Nepal Buddha Boy Documentary

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‘Buddha Boy’ reappears after year in jungle

Original: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/buddha-boy-reappears-after-year-in-jungle-1011713.html

Archive: http://archive.is/Sq2qo

They asked not where he had been or what he had been doing. Instead thousands of jubilant devotees simply trudged to the remote jungle spot in south-east Nepal where a teenage “Buddha Boy” reappeared to preach to villagers, more than a year after he went missing.

Ram Bahadur Bamjon became famous three years ago when tens of thousands of people flocked to watch him sitting cross-legged under a tree for almost ten months. His followers – who say he is the reincarnation of Buddha – claimed that during this time he neither ate nor drank.

Then, last spring, his supporters said that the teenager was planning to go away and meditate for three years in an underground bunker. He was last seen in August 2007, preaching to crowds in Nepal’s Hallori jungle, around 100 miles south of Kathmandu.

Whatever encouraged Mr Bamjon to re-emerge is unclear, but police said that on Monday he appeared, long-haired, dressed in white and looking in good health, and preached to villagers for around 45 minutes. Local officials said he plans to speak to people for an hour a day for another week.

“Hundreds of devotees, including many from neighbouring India are trekking the five kilometres to see him,” said one police officer, Prakash Sen. “He spoke to the devotees standing near a temple in the forest. He had shoulder-length hair and had his body wrapped in a white cloth. Since many people are walking to see him, I think he has some of the qualities Lord Buddha had.”

When Mr Bamjon first became famous reporters filmed him eating, even though his supporters said he could go without food or drink for days. He was also spotted sleeping when his followers said he was meditating in private. However, a number of witnesses spoke of the young man’s ability to sit fixed in one spot for hours on end

There has been no formal declaration by Buddhist authorities on whether they consider the teenager to be the reincarnation of Siddhartha Gautama, who was born in south-western Nepal in 500 BC and later became revered as the Buddha, or “Enlightened One”. Buddhist priests have been divided on the issue, despite the claims of his followers. Meanwhile local volunteers have collected thousands of dollars from people who have visited the young man, prompting accusations that he is merely at the centre of a clever and enlightened money-making scam.

Fight broke out between Ram Bamjan’s followers and local villagers

Original: http://timeskhabar.net/2014/09/02/fight-broke-ram-bamjans-followers-local-villagers/

Archive: http://archive.is/qZFoW

4 people were injured in a fight between local villagers and the followers of Ram Bahadur Bamjan who is well known as an ascetic person. This fight was happened when the followers of Ram Bamjan started to beat the local villagers for entering the jungle without permission. This fight was started when the villagers found that they had beaten one of the villagers named ‘Utim Guro’ vary badly all night tying his hands. In this fight, Ram Bamjan’s followers, Samir Gurung, Rup Bahadur Thing and Lama Balak are injured. Similarly, one villager, Rakesh Guro is also injured. Police has started their investigation for kidnapping the villager. Ram Bamjan has apologized on the behalf of his followers being such rude to the villagers.

Daniel B. Haber: Journey into the forest: Seeking the Enigmatic “Little Buddha” of Nepal

Excerpt. For more, please buy the book.

 

Who is Ram Bahadur Bomjon “Buddha Boy”

http://nepalrodi.blogspot.com/2012/08/ram-bahadur-bomjonbuddha-boy.html#.VGr680LSbre

http://archive.is/gcrDS

Controversy surrounding Buddha Boy 

From Who is Ram Bahadur Bomjon “Buddha Boy”

Posted by Stranger Vistior

Abstaining oneself from worldly pleasure and indulging into meditation for such a longer period of time, where one’s mind and soul is purely devoted to peace and harmony as well as striving to achieve spiritual wisdom, Ram Bahadur Bomjon quite well live up to his promise in spreading peace. However, the irony is that since few years he has been in media but for all the wrong reasons.

In the year 2010, Ram Bahadur Bomjon aka Buddha Boy with his followers thrashed 17 local villagers of Bara District and held them captive nearly for 24 hours as they were accused of disturbing His meditation. Again in the year 2012, Bomjon held two women (35 year old Slovakian woman and another Nepali Woman) hostage for 3 months. They were accused by his followers for practicing witchcraft to disrupt Bomjon’s meditation. Later when the news were published in media regarding the hostages of two women, his followers set them free but threatened not to disclose anything to media or to people during their 3 months detention. However, the freed 44 year old Slovakian woman Zsuzsanna Takacs still admires Bomjon even she was held captive for 3 months. She expressed that she wanted to become nun and devote herself in Buddhism as there are no monasteries in her country.

The violence not only stop there but again with followers of Bodhi Shrawan Dharma Sangh obstructed vehicular movement and clashed with local people of Bara district for not issuing Bomjan’s citizenship in the name of “Bodhi Shrawan Dharma Sangh” which is against the law. However the members of the group managed to issue fake citizenship certificate but later it was cancelled after legal authority found out this incident. After this event, he held his 12 year old sister Ranjita as hostage after his mother Mayadevi did not allow him and his followers to hand out her citizenship card to them which was necessary to issue Bomjon’s citizenship and diplomatic passport. Following the incident, Bomjon’s mother sent her two sons to free their younger sister, but again the members of Bodhi Shrawan Dharma Sangh detained both of the brothers. However all the three siblings were released later after the request from their mother Mayadevi.

All such terror and violence has not only led to tarnish the image of Buddhism but also raises the question of does Bomjon deserves to be called ”Buddha boy” and messenger of peace?

“But the world is submerged in its own selfish aim and nobody could keep the search of soul and the super soul in their heart. Today the world is in search of non violence and guidance in the form of kindness.”- These are some of the preaching of Bomjon but seems like one also needs to understand the simple fact that “Practice what you preach”.

Recent Updated Article of Ram Bahadur Bomjon “Buddha Boy” [ September 20th,2013 ]
http://nepalrodi.blogspot.com/2013/10/ram-bahadur-bomjon-aka-buddha-boy-pays.html#.UlBFBzt8mSo

Recent Updated Article of Ram Bahadur Bomjon “Buddha Boy”
http://Nepalrodi.blogspot.com/2012/10/ram-bahadur-bomjon-aka-buddha-boy.html

Source : The Himalayan Times http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/
Nepal News http://www.nepalnews.com/

By :- Avash Shrestha
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For Further Reading,

The above excerpt includes also the below text:

Who is Ram Bahadur Bomjon “Buddha Boy”

Posted by Stranger Vistior
Tags : Featured, Ram Bahadur Bomjon ( Buddha Boy )

The rules of Nature can neither be changed nor be challenged and when it comes to Human’s physical form, it is deeply guided by the simple truth that no man can live without food and water. If we are to challenge this law to some extent and search the history then even superior being like Gautam Buddha succeeded to survive for 49 days without food and water under Bodhi tree in search for enlightenment.

Looks like history have once again repeated as Twenty two years old Ram Bahadur Bomjon born on April 10, 1990 in Ratnapuri village, Bara District of Nepal is believed to have undergone fasting for more than 6 months during the Year from 2005 to 2006.

Ram Bahadur Bomjon “Buddha Boy”

Among the 5 sons and 4 daughters, Bomjon was the third son born to Poor Farmers.His mother Mayadevi who also shares the similar name as that of Gautam Buddha’ Mother shares the Childhood memories of Bomjon as he was very peaceful and was fascinated seeing holy person in the streets. In fact, Bomjon was different from other children around his age as he barely spoke and spent most of the time alone meditating. From the age of five, he only ate what was left over and if there was none then he would stay hungry. He spent most of the time meditating, reading scriptures and worshiping the pipal tree as these seems to give him pleasure.

While at Home he asked his family members not to sacrifice animals and eat meat. He even refrain his family members from drinking alcohol. In 2005 He disappeared from his home but soon he was found meditating by the villagers. Everyone initially thought he had gone ill or insane and requested to go home. Even his mother was worried and asked him to come home but he kept his focus and continued his meditation. Once when his older brother touched Bomjon during meditation state, his body became hot as fire and turned red. He said to his older brother that “Please leave me or one of us shall die”. He further added “If anyone disturbs me or my things at midnight, I will have to meditate for 20 years, but if all goes well, I will meditate for 6 years.”

On November 6th, 2005 Bomjon was bitten by Snake but however he continued to meditate and was able to overcome the poison of snake. After this miraculous event, many villagers believed that he attained enlightment.In addition; On November 11th, 2005 Bright different ray of light seems to appear from Bomjon’s forehead while he was meditating.

Thousands of people all over the world believes that he is re-incarnation of Buddha and even have given him a title of “Buddha Boy” by his followers. In fact, coincidently his mother also shares the same name Mayadevias that of Gautam Buddha’s Mother. They also have quietly remarked that “such an incarnation as only occurs once in thousands of years”. However there has been no formal declaration by Buddhist authorities as whether he is re-incarnation of Buddha or not. In fact, Bomjon himself have said that not to call him Buddha as he doesn’t possess the energy of Buddha.

source: Nepalnews.com

Meditating motionless and Fasting for such long period of time have really challenged the Human’s physical law and brought the attention of scientist, investigators and even Buddhist monks worldwide. People have tried to get closer look to Bomjon to study whether he really have endured to survive without eating and drinking for such longer period of time but the committee “Bodhi Shrawan Dharma Sangh “who is in charge of looking after him for his protection have not allowed visitors to get any closer than 15 feet while he is meditating.

“The Boy with Divine powers” – Discovery News Channel

In January 2006, Crew from Discovery channel filmed Bomjon continuously for 96 hours day and night from a distance. The Crew wanted to find out whether he had been given food supplies secretly and whether he is just another hoax but to their surprise, during 96 hours of filming he not only abstained himself from eating any solid or liquid substance but even there was no any sign of physical dehydration or malfunction. After filming Bomjon, Discovery channel have telecasted 46 mins of documentary called “The Boy with Divine powers” based on Bomjon.

See The Documentary Below

Recent Images of Ram Bahadur Bomjon aka Buddha Boy 

Ram Bahadur Bomjon (Buddha Boy ) moved to Sindhuli on June 15 from Talkhoriya of Bara district.Recent Images of Ram Bahadur Bomjon has been posted below:

Ram Bahadur Bomjon accompanied by Buddhist Monk during his religious visit in Sindhuli.

*Images extracted from ekantipur.com(   Rajkumar Karki /eKantipur

 

Locals clash with Bamjan’s followers

http://kathmandupost.ekantipur.com/printedition/news/2014-09-02/locals-clash-with-bamjans-followers.html

http://archive.is/M3UF4

LAXMI SAH, Bara

Sep 2, 2014-At least four people were injured when a clash erupted between locals and devotees of Ram Bahadur Bamjan, known as Buddha boy, at Halkhoriya on Tuesday. The clash flared up when around 100 locals intervened to rescue two others who were held captive by Bamjan’s followers since Monday.

According to local resident Jagjiban Kumar, the two sides clashed after Bamjan hit the locals with a stick. He said that the two captives were, however, released later. Uttim Guro and Sonam Kumar, both of Nijgad Municipality-11, along with their friends were said to be on their way back from work in India when they were captured.

The incident came to light after the duo’s friends informed the locals about what happened, after fleeing the incident. The injured, Bamjan’s followers Rup Bahadur Thing, Samir Gurung, Nagraj, and Rakesh Guro,have sustained injuries to the heads and bodies.

According to Police, who reached the site after being informed, said that Bamjan told them that he directed his followers to take Uttim and Sonam under control after ‘they under the influence of alcohol shouted offensive slurs’. Inspector Kailash Rai said that they will start investigating the matter.

Bamjan has been living in the forest at Halakhoriya for the past two months.

Published: 03-09-2014 09:23

Nepal’s ‘Buddha boy’ investigated for attacking group

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-south-asia-10776957

http://archive.is/YwSLn

Image captionRam Bomjan’s followers are convinced he is the reincarnation of the Buddha

A Nepalese man popularly known as “Buddha boy” is being investigated by police amid reports he beat a group of locals for disturbing his meditation.

Ram Bahadur Bomjan has admitted to assaulting some of the local villagers in Bara district on Thursday, according to local media.

Mr Bomjan is famed for spending months in the forest without eating.

His devotees believe he is the reincarnation of the Buddha, and he says he has not eaten since 2005.

When he started his fast, he pledged he would meditate for six years, until he gained enlightenment.

‘Slapped’

Manoj Neupane, superintendent of police for Bara district, said police were sent to investigate after 17 people lodged complaints.

Those who had been injured were sent for medical checks, he told the BBC.

According to Nepal’s Republica newspaper, the villagers claimed they had been looking for wild fruit and vegetables.

Mr Bomjan said he had slapped them “two or three times” after they came onto his platform and mimicked him, while the villagers allege they were assaulted more seriously.

“They disturbed me while I was meditating… tried to manhandle me,” Mr Bomjan was quoted as saying by Republica. “I was therefore forced to beat them.”

Last November, Mr Bomjan – who is reportedly around 20 years old – campaigned against the mass sacrifice of some 250,000 animals at the Gadhimai festival in southern Nepal.